A healthy Derrick Rose keeps Cleveland afloat in the East

The Cavaliers signed Derrick Rose on Monday in one of the most uninspiring change of teams by a former MVP in recent memory.

It's uninspiring because injuries have robbed Rose of the form he had when he won the MVP in the 2010-11 season. Also, Cleveland already has a better point guard on the roster as of today (more on that later).

But for as uninspiring as the move is now, it's still a good pickup for the Cavs. Some argue that Rose is no longer good and has no value, which simply isn't true. The flaw in that logic is the tendency to compare Rose to his former self, an MVP-level performer, rather than other players in his new salary bracket. The truth is, at one-year, $2.1 million, the Cavaliers got Rose on a bargain. Michael Carter-Williams, Aaron Brooks, Raymond Felton and Jose Calderon are just a few point guards in line to make more money than Rose next season.

The former Bulls All-Star has been trending upwards the last two years. Since playing in just 100 games over four seasons from 2011 to 2014, Rose has played in 130 over the last two seasons. He increased his scoring average from 16.4 PPG to 18.0 PPG over those two seasons and shot 47% from the field last season, his best since his third year in the league. He'll need to improve on a career-low 22% from three, especially playing for the Cavs, but he's never been a great three-point shooter. Last season, Rose showed flashes of that same early-career athleticism that allowed him to get into the paint and finish at the rim at will.

For a Cleveland team that always plays late into the postseason, Rose's skill-set, and maybe his body too, would've been better suited in a sixth-man role. He would've been an upgrade over Deron Williams as Kyrie Irving's backup. Now that Irving is seemingly forcing Cleveland's hand in trade talks, however, Rose will be thrust into a starting role he may not be fit for. Irving's ability to stretch the floor, along with Kevin Love and J.R. Smith, gave Cleveland's starting unit good spacing. Without Irving, the dynamics of this offense changes, and not for the better. That's before diving into whether Rose will be available the entire season. Still, if Cleveland deals Irving, the team is better off with Rose than without.

LeBron James is good enough to carry to the NBA Finals whichever version of the Cavaliers show up on opening night, but Cleveland is measuring itself against the Warriors, not the Eastern Conference. Rose's addition is enough to keep an Irving-less Cavs team atop the East, but the real issue is he significantly reduces their chances of running with Golden State come June.

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crowned

you remember that clingy person that you couldn’t get rid of? the one that no matter how many hints you dropped, they didn’t get it? they wouldn’t go away! you remember how aggravating and annoying that person was, right? well, you should because that person is you.

you hold your public figures in high regard, your favorite actors, musicians, comedians, maybe politicians, and most of all athletes. when anyone is even mentioned in the same breath as whomever your favorite athlete is, you shun the notion and proceed to lambaste the person being compared as though he/she made the comparison. with the cleveland cavaliers winning the first championship in franchise history last week, i think you can guess where i’m going with this: lebron james.

i’m not here to compare james to some of your favorite players, not michael jordan, kobe bryant, larry bird, magic johnson, dwyane wade? but for some reason you are. when people mention how great james is, your first response is, “but he’s not jordan,” or “kobe was better than him.” maybe you’re right, maybe you’re wrong, but the truth is, james’ greatness stands on its own. it doesn’t need to be confirmed or affirmed in comparison to what others accomplished. bryant wasn’t great in the way that jordan was great, and james isn’t great in the way that they were great. but he is without question an all-time great player.

if you don’t trust your eyes, or if the haterade is blinding you, i’ll provide a little bit of proof of his greatness. since james entered the league in 2003, with the loftiest of expectations (which he lived up to), he has won four regular-season mvp awards. that’s more than any other player over that time. but since you like comparisons so much, that’s one short of jordan’s five, and three more than the one kobe won. he has three nba championships and won the nba finals mvp each time. and by the way, he’s 31. jordan also had three championships at 31. sure, james joined the miami heat with the likes of wade and chris bosh to get the first two, but he was still the best player on those teams. and they didn’t win a title untilĀ wade relinquished the reigns of the team to james after losing in the 2011 finals.

changing teams shouldn’t have skewed your vision of what james can do and has done on the basketball court, but if it did, let me ask you this: if charles barkley would’ve won a ring in phoenix or houston after leaving philly, would anyone have cared that he changed teams? not only would his accomplishment not be seen as less, he would’ve been considered an even greater player than we regard him now. would you have thought less of allen iverson if he left those trash 76ers teams and won a ring on a better squad? i wouldn’t. if james stayed in cleveland and never won a ring (he didn’t have any help) why would that have made him any more of a player in your eyes? karl malone never got a ring and is still regarded by many people as one of the best power forwards to ever play the game. and by the way, nobody cried when he went to the lakers to try to get a ring with bryant.

this latest championship doesn’t cement james as an all-time great, he was already there. now, he’s just jockeying for position among that list. he’s adding things to his resume that other players don’t have. he’s defining his own greatness, aside from what other players have accomplished. no one in the king james era has reached six straight finals. sure, he went to miami, but then he came back to cleveland and went to two more, and he’ll probably reach another one next season. james is the common denominator. a player hasn’t led his team to as many consecutive finals since bill russell in the 60’s. james led his team to the title after going down 3-1 in the series, something that had never been done in the history of the nba – in 32 tries before this year. oh, and he did it against the greatest regular season team of all-time.

just to be clear, i still think mj is the greatest player ever, but mj also played on the greatest team i ever seen, for one of the greatest coaches, with one of the greatest sidekicks. we never seen jordan carry an inferior team the way james did. and yes, james did carry the cavs. he led every single player on either team of the nba finals in points, rebounds, assists, steals, and blocks. that is another feat that had never been accomplished. he might not have the same shooting ability as some of our other favorite players, especially in late-game situations, but that block on andre iguodala (see above) was one of the most clutch plays i’ve ever witnessed.

no doubt, i once clung to my favorites too. i rode for jay-z as the greatest rapper so hard and for so long that it made it hard for me to realize how great other rappers were, because i was comparing them to him too much. before you know it, a person’s prime is over, and someone else steps in. eventually, i got to a place where i could appreciate other rappers and what they offered, rather than what they didn’t. if you hate lebron james, i would encourage you to start appreciating the greatness that we are witnessing. before you know it, someone else will step up as the game’s best player, and you’ll have to hate someone new.